-   Lost Password?   -   Register
  -   Lost Password?   -   Register

members do not see advertisements

England & Scotland FAs to defy poppy ban
Author Message
seasider Offline
Administrator

Posts: 58,743
Joined: Feb 2012
Post: #1
England & Scotland FAs to defy poppy ban
Quote:The Football Associations of England and Scotland say they will defy a ban on players wearing poppies when the teams meet on Armistice Day.

The FAs will let players wear black armbands with poppy emblems and are willing to accept any punishment.

Fifa general secretary Fatma Samba Diouf Samoura told BBC Sport "any kind of sanction" could follow.

World football's governing body prohibits political, religious or commercial messages on shirts.

UK Prime Minister Theresa May has called the rule "outrageous".

FIFA say "Britain is not the only country that has been suffering from the result of war. The only question is why are we doing exceptions for just one country and not the rest of the world?"

Worth a sanction?
(This post was last modified: 03-11-2016 08:23 by seasider.)
03-11-2016 08:23
Find Posts Quote
TheSteed Offline
Site Overlord

Posts: 1,005,369
Joined: Jan 2012
Post: #2
RE: England & Scotland FAs to defy poppy ban
No, you don't need an image of a plant on your clothing to remember the dead.
03-11-2016 08:46
Find Posts Quote
seasider Offline
Administrator

Posts: 58,743
Joined: Feb 2012
Post: #3
RE: England & Scotland FAs to defy poppy ban
What a coincidence Ireland are now being punished... FIFA are making things up as they go along!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/37872020
04-11-2016 12:25
Find Posts Quote
Cheesyleps Offline
Banned

Posts: 8,323
Joined: Mar 2012
Post: #4
RE: England & Scotland FAs to defy poppy ban
(04-11-2016 12:25)seasider Wrote:  What a coincidence Ireland are now being punished... FIFA are making things up as they go along!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/37872020

Ireland's move was far more political than the use of a poppy as a symbol of remembrance. It is difficult to pinpoint when exactly you would consider EIRE to have existed. The 1916 uprising was a massive event but they never got formal sovereignty until about 1949. I genuinely don't think FIFA realised just how political a statement that it was until we pointed it out to them.

Whilst the poppy isn't seen by us as a political symbol it still represents the projection of military power by the 'empire' rather than some kind of universal suffrage. The view of it from anywhere that suffered under colonial rule or gunboat diplomacy may well be very different. FIFA's stance makes sense from the point of view that if you allow one then you end up having to make a decision on every country individually. That's bound to end up causing more harm.
05-11-2016 12:21
Find Posts Quote
bpoolkev1966 Offline
Registered User

Posts: 1,347
Joined: Sep 2013
Post: #5
RE: England & Scotland FAs to defy poppy ban
Just to piss FIFA off why not have special nets made with a poppy logo on them or give out poppy cards to the crowd to hold up during the anthems and paint a giant poppy into the grass behind each goal Thumbsup2
05-11-2016 18:02
Find Posts Quote

members do not see advertisements

daib0 Offline
Interforum Gamemaster!

Posts: 5,445
Joined: Mar 2012
Post: #6
RE: England & Scotland FAs to defy poppy ban
BBC Sport



England v Scotland: Fifa says Poppy ban reports a 'distortion of facts'

Fifa says it has not banned the display of poppies by England and Scotland footballers, insisting any such claim is a "distortion of the facts". Both England and Scotland asked to wear black armbands bearing a poppy during their World Cup qualifier at Wembley on Friday, which is Armistice Day. Rules forbid "political" statements on shirts and Fifa says it does not have the power to grant such requests. Northern Ireland and Wales will wear plain armbands in their fixtures.

Fifa says it has reminded the four football associations of the rules - though the FA of Wales said Fifa "turned down a request for the Wales national team to wear poppies on their shirts or on armbands".

England Under-21s wore poppies on black armbands during their win over Italy on Thursday night. Football's rules are laid out by the International Football Association Board - which is made up of the four British FAs and Fifa. Any breach of the rules is dealt with by Fifa's disciplinary committee - which Fifa says is an independent body. It added it could not pre-judge what symbols would constitute a breach of rules.

Fifa said that when contacted by the four FAs about wearing poppy symbols, it "reminded them about law four" - which states players are not allowed to wear "political, religious or personal slogans, statements or images". The sport's governing says it "reiterated" to the FAs that "only the independent disciplinary committee can decide" if the rules have been broken and what sanction should apply. "The perception that Fifa 'banned' anything is a distortion of the facts," it added.

English FA chief executive Martin Glenn has said it will contest any fine. "Fifa have much bigger problems they should be concentrating on," he said. "I'm confident our legal position is right and our moral position is right. Our case is absolutely rock solid."

Northern Ireland - who host Azerbaijan in Belfast on Friday - will wear plain black armbands, as will Wales when they play Serbia on Saturday. Fans at Cardiff City Stadium will form a poppy mosaic before kick-off. The Football Association of Wales said it could not risk a financial penalty or point deduction.

Fifa's secretary general, Fatma Samoura, told BBC Sport last week: "We have to apply uniformly and across the 211 member associations the laws of the game. Britain is not the only country that has been suffering from the result of war. The only question is why are we doing exceptions for just one country and not the rest of the world?"

Interim England manager Gareth Southgate described the poppy on Thursday as "part of our identity as a nation. We're just pleased that we can honour the sacrifice of those who have gone before us," he added.

Scotland captain Darren Fletcher said: "First and foremost, I think everyone would love to wear the poppy and wants to wear the poppy to show our respect. Fifa have their rules and you understand why, but hopefully common sense prevails."

What could happen next?

The first stage in any disciplinary process that might follow Friday's game would be for Fifa's match commissioner at Wembley to include the armbands in the official report.

The case would then go to the disciplinary committee, which would announce its decision a few weeks later. A points deduction is the most serious sanction available but a fine is considered to be more likely.

The British FAs would then have an opportunity to challenge that fine via Fifa's appeals process and a further chance to appeal at the Court of Arbitration for Sport, a course of action that would probably cost more than the fine.
11-11-2016 09:42
WWW Find Posts Quote




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Contact Us | Back Henry Street | Return to Top | Mobile Version | RSS Syndication | Forum Rules